The Hour of Code application teaches programming skills for iPhone owners

By | September 14, 2017

From Candy Crush Saga to Instagram, developing mobile apps is never potentially lucrative. But what about the learning code on a smartphone?

 

That’s the purpose of Codecademy: Code Time, an iPhone application this week issued by the founders of the American Training Education opleidingscodecademie, whose website teaches people to code in languages ​​like JavaScript, HTML / CSS, Python Ruby.

 

The first mobile application company begins with a simple goal: to help iPhone owners “The fundamentals of coding in less than an hour teach” through a series of quick demonstrations and short-term day exercises.
“Our app starts by introducing you to the basics behind the apps on your phone and the websites you visit. You learn to understand the basic structure of the code as you see it,” explains the App Store list.

 

“Use your phone for what is good – fast, fun exercise program in progress if you are at home and stay cool to continue the road road ..”

 

Codecademy was founded in 2011 by Zach Sims and Ryan Bubinski, and has since funded $ 12.5 million to burn their ambitious demystiserende programming. More than 450,000 enrolled in online courses as part of the company’s Code Year initiative in 2012, with more than 60% of users now located outside the US.

 

“Codecademy was originally built for someone like me to learn how to codify them. Now we want to provide an easy way for people to learn the skills they need to learn skills, start businesses and find new jobs,” said Sims El Guardian in October this year.
“We all want to learn the most interactive and fun to do and to help our users change the world.” Most other programming committee signatures learn through text or video-based approaches. way to learn how to code is to learn by doing – to actually encrypt. ”

 

At the time of writing, Hour of Code is not released for other smartphones, especially Android. It is possible that Codecademy expects the iPhone version to be approved by Apple before its launch on Android – an increasingly familiar model for smartphone applications.

Codecademy is not the first company to explore mobile applications as a way to learn programming people. Some applications have launched the start in 2012 and 2013 to encrypt children, including Hakitzu Elite: Robot Hackers, Hopscotch, Bone Light, and Kodable Moves the Turtle.

Another American start-up, Play-i, has barely raised $ 1.4 million through a crowdfunding campaign on its website to launch two consumer robots by Bo and Yana, who teach children how to learn by encrypting their companions of iOS and Android.

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