BlackBerry Responds to all the News that Clicks

By | November 19, 2017

Professional journalists, including our Globe and Mail friends, almost always share certain characteristics: they stubbornly seek the truth, they can separate facts from their opinions and instinctively follow a good story, wherever it leads. In addition, almost none of them writes their own headlines.

That task corresponds to an editor who must mark the most clickable elements of history and transform them into heads that induce traffic, which are much more perceptions than those that the content of the article can reach. It is only on Wednesday and this week we have already taken 3 headlines that we think are deceptive and worthwhile, even if the content of 2 of those articles is reflected in BlackBerry.

We have requested that each publication update the headlines with facts and hope that they do so. While we wait, we also feel obliged to use all the tools at our disposal to correct the registration.

CG Magazine
• This first title points to a continuous challenge for BlackBerry as we run from the device manufacturer to the software provider that protects communication and business collaboration; between people and, increasingly, the growing universe of network endpoints that we collectively call the “Company of Things”. We have been very open about the fact that BlackBerry no longer manufactures phones, although we have licensed our designs to select partners that continue to manufacture phones that proudly display our brand and are protected with our software.

  • The heading indicates that the story is about the future of BlackBerry Ltd., while the article itself is a simple question and answer with a manager of one of our partners and focused on the devices that produce, market and sell
  • A much more precise head (and the difference is material, not subtle) could be:
    The balloon and the mail
  • We have attracted the attention of both the boss and the body because they carried a false story: the decision of the Canadian federal government to admit multiple devices and operating systems of the phone indicates that the end is near BlackBerry. End of what?

We no longer manufacture phones, but that’s old news.

o Our relationship with the government is really growing. Any sanctioned device that a federal employee uses for government activities will in fact use BlackBerry software to secure their communication channels.
o As we see it, BlackBerry has just started.

  • We provide the reporter (and his competitors) with a written statement challenging this false story and requesting that the story be updated with our comments.
    • After consulting with their editors, they decided to keep the story as it is, and that is their right.
  • In our own right, we have sent a letter to the editor that we expect The Globe to publish in the next few days, after which we will update this message with the full text of the letter.

The last doubtful head leads a very favorable story that followed the distribution of our clarification to the Globe. In this case, the content of the story is favorable for BlackBerry and quite effective in refuting Globe’s original story. But … the head is simply not correct.

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